Football / Women’s Euro. After 56 years of international scarcity, England is only one step away from regaining height

England are not the favorites against a Germany trying to regain its supremacy in women’s football given the numbers. Crowned eight times at the continental level, in 12 editions, the Germans reigned undisputedly on six editions from 1995 to 2013. Notably, they crushed England in the final of the Finnish edition, in 2009 (6-2).

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England’s record pales in comparison, as apart from Helsinki’s defeat, they have only had one other Euro final to their name, losing to Sweden, in the very first edition in 1984. But by reaching the final, they have already put an end to a Black streak of three consecutive defeats in the half, and they arrive with unprecedented sporting and popular momentum.

Realism, efficiency, spectacle

Apart from the quarter-final against Spain, the team whose style suits them the least, England has played all their matches, even against Norway (8-0), or the semi-final against Sweden (4-0), N. 2 on the FIFA ranking.

Under the impulse of their Dutch coach Sarina Wiegman, the English have developed an attractive game, devilishly effective – 20 goals in 5 matches, just one against – and sometimes even spectacular, such as the victorious strike in the top corner of Georgia Stanway against Spain or the heel of Alessia Russo between the legs of the Swedish goalkeeper.

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Despite a controversy for the league over the choice of stadiums, unworthy or at least too small for the competition, there was popular success, including for the games without England.

UEFA has indicated that nearly 490,000 spectators attended the 30 games played, an average of more than 16,000 per game and most importantly, more than double the total for the 2017 edition, which set the previous record at 240,055. be taken much higher with the final, Wembley which can seat 87,200.

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Growing media attention

With the presence of the host country in the final, the attendance record for a match of the European Championship, women or men, could very well be improved, as it currently stands at 79,115, in the final of the European Championship 1964 in Spain, won by the latter against the USSR (2-1).

Media interest also grew, with the England-Sweden semi-final drawing 9.3 million spectators, not counting those who did not count the match on computers, giant screens or in catering establishments.

Remarkably little used in stadiums since the start of the competition, the unofficial and bittersweet anthem of the “Three Lions”, “Football’s coming home”, which has broken male disillusionment for 25 years, may therefore be null and void. are made by the “Lionesses” on Sunday evenings.

The biting memory of the penalty defeat to Italy (1-1, 3-2 after pens), just over a year ago, naturally remains in everyone’s mind. But the whole country wants to believe that 56 years of waiting will come to an end since the men’s team’s planetary coronation in 1966. It was already at Wembley. Already against Germany.

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