“Teenage sex education is a right and it should be egalitarian,” advocates Gang du clit author Julia Pietri

A changing body. Growing hair. And questions about sexual identity, gender or even masturbation. Welcome to adolescence. Period when it is not always easy to find simple and reliable answers to intimate questions.

In The Little Guide To Sexual Pussy – Part 2 (ed. Better Call Julia), in bookstores this Friday, the author Julia Piétri, creator of the Instagram account @gangduclito, answers all the questions that can happen to teenagers, and questions from 20 minutes

Sex education guides already exist. Why write one for teens and what makes it stand out?

I decided to write the guidebook that I wish I had had in my hands as a teenager and experimented with on the entry into puberty. In my day, information was quite rare: I remember being given a teen sex education guide as a gift and looking for “masturbation,” the only thing written was “it doesn’t make you deaf,” as if it wasn’t a real topic.

This book is designed to help a course succeed, break all taboos and give all teenagers in 2022 the answers to the questions they ask about the body – their own and that of others, puberty, sexuality, the first times, with a scientific approach, and without sexualizing the body. At the same time, it is not a book focused on hygiene, prevention and danger. The bias is to provide hyper-benevolent and comforting content, to explain that puberty can be a great time in life.

A period in which we ask ourselves many questions about identity, gender, and where we are confronted with a number of commandments and preconceived notions regarding sexuality…

Absolute ! I come from a militant background, I am a feminist and it was essential to breathe that spirit into this book, to make it a tool for egalitarian sex education. This includes deconstructing received ideas and breaking down myths that adversely affect sexuality. Women have long learned that entering into sexuality is through pain, that it hurts the first time, that’s how it is. This is a misconception that many women find it very difficult to regain their desire and pleasure. Because no, it’s not normal. Similarly, penetration is not mandatory during sexual intercourse. There is an injunction to satisfy male desires and female pleasure is often denied in the prevailing discourse. Gender equality also includes equality of pleasure and information, by talking about orgasm, consent, rules or body hair.

It is in this idea that the anatomical signs are presented in the same way, to break the received idea of ​​one strong sex and the other weak and the image of the only penis erect. Let’s not forget the clitoris! Because everyone has an erectile organ. Promoting anatomical equality in the representation of bodies then helps to change mentalities.

How do you find the right tone for these questions that teens often don’t dare to ask?

To connect with the teens who will read this guide and give them confidence, I open up a bit about the complexes and questions I had at their age. This shows that it is a universal step, that anyone can be complexed. I, I advocate a popular culture, flexible pedagogy. Today, in the age of social networks and a kind of elitist feminism of knowledge, there is no longer the idea of ​​transference, we are immediately in virulence. By adopting a simple and uninhibited tone, in inclusive writing, all identities feel represented, and those who do not fully understand these questions find answers.

This is also the reason why there are also sourcing pages that allow them to go further and get information in a safe and reliable way. There is both a link to family planning and QR codes linking to well-designed videos about consent or condom use, made by serious Youtubers who know young people well, to adapt to their communication codes.

The idea is to make it both a support for oneself, where one can take refuge alone, at this age when one is emancipated. But also a means of communication to accompany speech.

The first part of this guide was aimed at children aged 4 and above and the second part for teenagers aged 12 to 16. What do you say to those who think it’s too young to talk about sexuality?

Part 1 is intended for children, but also and especially for parents, to help them answer “pee shit” questions and find the right words and tone to talk about anatomy, nudity, prohibitions, but also emotions and sisterhood. To establish a dialogue and put the child at ease when talking.

As for teens, you need to be aware of the reality: today in 2022, most 12-year-old teens have already watched porn at least once and for a long time. Without necessarily having ended up in sexuality, they have already entered into a – distorted – representation of sexuality. The idea of ​​this guide is to provide information and reflection tools to support them both in their construction and in the deconstruction of received ideas that they have already been able to absorb.

Hence the importance of talking to them about their rights, about consent, to explain what the culture of rape is: all these fundamental topics, which touch on patriarchy and which we talk too little about, because we do not have feminist and activist have upbringing. However, sex education is a right.

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